Tag Archives: Brian Borg San Diego

Hiking and Nature – A Recreational and Therapeutic Activity

Brian Borg studied philosophy and graduated from San Diego State University summa cum laude. A longtime resident of San Diego, Brian Borg spends much of his free time enjoying nature and taking hikes.

Hiking comes as a natural exercise and requires no special equipment. It is basic to most sporting activities such as mountain climbing, hunting, and cross-country skiing. Hiking can also be an essential part of simple activities such as bird-watching, nature walks, and sightseeing. It is one way to take advantage of what nature offers – the scenery as well as the often-needed therapy that hiking offers.

Hiking and nature help unclog the mind from everyday stressors, allowing inspiration to rise within those who need it. For instance, Ludwig Van Beethoven enhanced his creativity while writing music by taking walks. Furthermore, studies show that hiking brings positive effects on the mind and body. As a physical activity, it stimulates the release of endorphins, which results in an energized and more content spirit. These benefits can be had while enjoying a peaceful escape, away from the daily routine of life.

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Common Mammals That Call the Grand Canyon Home

Brian Borg is a San Diego area resident who enjoys spending time with his family and exploring nearby natural sites. Outside of San Diego, Brian Borg has hiked in numerous national parks, from Yosemite to the Grand Canyon, and photographed the unique trees and wildlife of the area.

The Grand Canyon hosts a diversity of mammals, including sure-footed bighorn sheep that thrive along rocky canyon walls and steep traverses. Subsisting on carrion and rodents, Arizona coyotes are more commonly heard than seen around the region. Acclimatized to humans, the coyote often searches out campsites and refuse receptacles for food. Raccoons also have made a nighttime strategy of raiding campsites for edibles.

The most common sighting for many along the canyon’s south rim are mule deer, which can be seen grazing on shrubs and bushes, and may reach a weight of 200 pounds. One of their primary predators is the mountain lion which, despite making a comeback, is rarely spotted by visitors. Hunted by bobcat, coyotes, and predatory birds, the cottontail rabbit has a diet of leaves, berries, and local grasses and is also wary of humans.

A common winged mammal is the canyon bat, which can be glimpsed at dusk along the canyon edges, chasing flying insects.